Screentology

Bad Cupid (2021) Review: How far would you go for love?

In ‘Bad Cupid’ Dave, a heartbroken man, faces a twisted opportunity from Archie, a complete stranger to gets his girl back.

Directed by: Diane Cossa, Neal Howard.

Starring: John Rhys-Davies, Shane Nepveu, Briana Marin, Claybourne Elder, Amelia Sorensen, Christine Turturro, Darleen Pickering Hummert, Joseph G. Giambra, Preach Freedom, Christina Foster, Gregory P. Robbins, Jenny Marie McCabe, Bethany Burrows, Pamela Mangus, David Autovino, Laura Barriere, Dan Torres, Leah Berst, Nick Stevens, Kaelyn Walter.

Country: United States.

Genre: Comedy, romance.

Running time: 81 minutes.

 

Among my friends, I’m the guy who usually can’t stand your everyday romantic comedy. And yet, I love romantic movies when they’re done right. Even some romantic comedies work for me when their frame is emotionally witty and don’t function with the regular rules of “love always wins”. Sadly, formulas sell and romantic comedies are those movies that the more shallow they are, the more they conquer.

I was searching for the next film to watch in a cold and cloudy afternoon and Bad Cupid came up. Normally, I wouldn’t pick it as my next choice. But the promise of a veteran actor doing comedy and the aura of indie cinema, made me press play. Suffice it to say, the film is not exactly what you think of at first.

Never judge a book by its cover, and never discard romantic comedies just because they appear to follow the formula. Bad Cupid is far from being your cheesy film about love.

 

A stubborn decision leads to the unexpectedly dark

Dave is good guy. Even when he gets dumped by his girlfriend, he doesn’t react as if he can change her mind. He just stares at some calendar and counts how many days have gone by. His cousin is a very funny girl who attempts everything to get Dave out of the heartbreak. When they go to Las Vegas and actually get lucky, Dave finds out his ex girlfriend is already with someone else, and she’s planning to get

In this town, a strange man with red shoes is doing whatever he can to get people to fall in love. His methods are extreme and dangerous but effective. When he’s having a drink and finds out about Dave’s situation, he decides to act. Because true love should always thrive, right?

A heartbroken man and his cousin, alongside the strangest cupid you’ve ever seen and a kidnapped groom, begin a journey to stop a wedding. This is a very strange series of events.

An ordinary conversation

The best thing about Bad Cupid is it never feels as a manipulated product of someone who can’t stop changing a final version of something that’s already natural. In fact when Archie, the awkward cupid, is in the scene, the film stalls a bit. It’s a showcase for John Rhys-Davis to do a bit of comedy.

However, when Dave and Morris, are just cousins trying to work out some plan, the film is undeniably funny. Those were the scenes that worked the best and made me forget the presence of the only known face in the movie. Another scene involving an old lady is an example of the execution of a very quirky script. I laughed to tears.

Some films make you smile

Bad Cupid is a very simple film that displays the substance of Buffalo in its best form. It’s cozy, warm and smart, considering its plot is not as smart as I was looking for. But it made me smile, and that’s something I can’t always say with indie comedies.

Hits Misses

Briana Marin as Morris is unmistakably the best thing about the film even if she stays in a supporting frame. Her performance is natural, quirky and hilarious.

– It seems logical that John Rhys-Davis is a prominent element of the indie film. He dominates every scene he’s in and seems quite comfortable with a morally complex character.

– The bathroom scene is unnecessarily long and tedious.

– Dave’s character is not supposed to be as whiny as he ends up being due to his stubbornness.

Rating:

 

A trailer

With information from YouTube, IMDB, FilmAffinity.

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